thecarnut.typepad.com > 2007 TOKYO MOTOR SHOW PRESS DAY #1

Toyota's FT-HS Front End

Toyota's FT-HS Front End

Talk about "Mako Shark"! Cutting-through the clutter at the show, the leading edge of the Toyota FT-HS gas/electric hybrid concept sports car attracted a lot of attention, not just for its overall styling, but for its near-ready-for-production appearance. This front-drive car (at least we think it is FWD) cold very well be the new Supra from Toyota.


Toyota Crown Hybrid Concept

Toyota Crown Hybrid Concept

Hey, Daddy-o, get a load of those wild rims! They look like someone at the Dub factory got ill on last year's blueprints ... In silhouette view, Toyota's new Crown gas/electric hybrid-powered "concept" looked more like last year's Buick than any other car at the show. The car looked like it was driven to the Makuhari Messe Convention Center direct from a local Toyota dealership; Crown is a very popular Japan-market car, especially for middle-management and government bureaucrat types, and often they are chauffer-driven. Look for this car to be produced, much as it appears in the photo, in just a few more months. And with the hybrid powerplant. But don't look for it outside of Japan and Asia.


Toyota F1 Car

Toyota F1 Car

Toyota had a small exhibit dedicated to their Formula 1 race team, one of the bigger disasters, both in competition and in terms of dollars spent (some say as much as $250 million a year for the two-car team) for the usually high-flying company in recent years.


Toyota F1 Drivers

Toyota F1 Drivers

Jarno Trulli and Ralf Schumacher were the Toyota F1 team drivers for 2007, but Schumacher announced he would be leaving the team after this season, well before the Tokyo Motor Show. Some found it humorous that one of the 'dummies' in the Toyota F1 display had Schumacher's name on it ...


Toyota F1 Car

Toyota F1 Car

A high-flying view of the Toyota F1 car for the 2007 season. Formula 1 will change tremendously in the next few years as "superteams" are allowed and formed, using engines from other teams and chassis from even others. Toyota remains one of the few teams engineering and building their own F1 engine and chassis (Ferrari is another, with great success), but the need for that may go away in years to come, as more teams share more and more bits and pieces.


Toyota F1 Car; Front View

Toyota F1 Car; Front View

Looking every bit the winner it should be, Toyota's F1 car drew the expected crowds at the Tokyo Motor Show; Honda is the only other Japanese-based F1 team building their own chassis and engines, like Toyota. No matter how much money Toyota has thrown at their team, though, victory, or even a string of decent finishes, have eluded them.


Daihatsu OFC1 ("Open Future Concept 1")

Daihatsu OFC1 ("Open Future Concept 1")

The "Open Future Concept 1" from Daihatsu is "a sports car mini vehicle, spotlighting the fun potential of small cars", says the company. Well, it IS small, alright. Here's another one of those "little one-seat wonders" which the Japanese car-makers seem intent to deliver for the large and growing elderly market in their home nation. Daihatsu, which is wholly-owned by Toyota, and is sort of Toyota's "small car division" in Japan, hopes, as other car-makers do with their concepts for the future, that Japan's old-sters who don't want to (or can't) drive their own car and don't want to (or can't) take a train, will be drawn to these tiny, often one-seat vehicles which are easy to operate and provide very easy and simple entry and exit.


Toyota's "I-Real"  and "IQ Concept" Future Cars

Toyota's "I-Real" and "IQ Concept" Future Cars

More tiny cars aimed at the elderly, these from Toyota. They are called "I-Real" (the black car on the right) and the "IQ concept" (white car on the left) and both provide huge doors for easy ingress and egress (as the astronauts say). While almost small enough to fit into this new class of "one-person drivers" specifically aimed at Japan's huge and growing aging audience, these seem to be more like "real cars" with everything to make them street-legal in Japan; our feeling is that both elderly and the youngest licensed drivers will be drawn to them.


Toyota "IQ Concept"

Toyota "IQ Concept"

One more tiny car from Toyota aimed at new and different buyers --- The elderly and, perhaps, Japan's youngest drivers, too. It's called the "IQ Concept", and both groups are looking for safe, efficient and good-looking transportation, and gas stingy engines are a foregone conclusion in a country where we saw a liter of gas selling for almost $7 when we were there the third week of October, 2007, for the Tokyo Motor Show. Could cars of this size ever make it in the US? The success or failure of the new Smart will tell that story in this country (sold only at Penske dealerships).


Toyota "i-Real"

Toyota "i-Real"

Here they are in differing exterior and interior colors ... Versions of Toyota's "i-Real" concept, built for easy operation by one person. We watched as the designer of these little units had journalists from various nations try them out for a ride around the convention hall, and almost all were able to pick-up and understand the operation of the "i-Real" with only a few moments of coaching and no need to understand Japanese. They are operated by a combination of on-board intelligence built into the machines, and input from the operator which the vehicle intuitively understands. Lean right, turn right. Lean back, slow down. Easy enough for almost anyone of any age, it would seem.


Toyota FT-MV Hybrid Luxury Minivan Concept

Toyota FT-MV Hybrid Luxury Minivan Concept

Though billed as a "concept", this could be a first-look at the next-generation of the popular Toyota Estima minivan, powered in this version by a gasoline/electric hybrid powerplant. An all-new hybrid, gas/electric Estima hit the Japan marketplace and is selling even better than Toyota expected. Too boxy for the US market, FT-MV was Toyota's only effort at a minivan concept at the 40th Tokyo Motor Show, telling us that minivans might have seen their day come and go ... at least in Japan, and at least according to Toyota.


Toyota FT-MV Minivan Concept

Toyota FT-MV Minivan Concept

With only a few modifications, this "concept" might be the next version of the Estima minivan in Japan and possibly throughout much of Asia, but it's not for the US, Toyota execs told us. The gas/electric hybrid powerplant will draw attention from every segment of the buying public in Japan. A new Estima hybrid has just been introduced in the Japan market; this FT-MV boasts loads of electronics, like TV screens behind each seat and power reclining seats in the second and third rows.


Yes, I'll Take One Of Those ... Whatever They Are ...

Yes, I'll Take One Of Those ... Whatever They Are ...

One of the guilty pleasures of the Tokyo Motor Show, at least for us US-type guys, is the Japanese corporate and cultural attitude towards women as not much more than automotive accessories (when they are not in the office making copies or serving tea to their bosses). Those attitudes result in the tradition of the smiling, scantily dressed and cute (of course) Tokyo Motor Show "show girl". Since attending the Tokyo automotive extravaganza for the first time some 30 years ago, it's one aspect pf the show which has not changed a whit. It's simply amazing that the country has accomplished so much while cruelly ignoring more than half of their population when it comes to their nation's various businesses and industries. Women are still very much expected to run the households, dole out cash to their husbands and family from his paycheck, take care of all elderly relatives (homes are typically occupied by three or even four generations of family members, due to deeply-felt tradition as much as the high cost of real estate) and if they are not married by age 25 or so, they can become virtual outcasts. In reality, there are many, many places in this impressive and extraordinary nation where the “Japanese mindset” has failed, and sometimes miserably so, ranging from obviously raging and rampant alcoholism to a new habit among the country's youth, "group suicide". Young people use the Internet to find others who are like-minded (hopeless and depressed), and they may pile into a minivan, park out in the country, light up a Hibachi stove and die from the fumes. Perhaps if women had a bit more input into their society and were treated with more than the modicum of respect they do receive, such problems could be dealt with more honestly and openly. For instance, I once had a long discussion while on the Shinkansen (known popularly as the "Bullet Train", but the term actually means "Super Express") with an English-speaking Japanese psychiatrist, who said be picked his profession in order to "save his people". He also said there were not more than a handful of psychiatrists in Japan, because it's a country where hiding your true your feelings is the accepted (and necessary, they feel) norm. He also said that no one admits to an alcoholism problem in Japan, because, he said, "Everyone is an alcoholic. So, there's no problem!". At this time, alcoholism and many other deeply-entrenched societal troubles are just not dealt with at all. OK, editorial over ... back to the cars!


What Route?!?!

What Route?!?!

Just one of the many signs and posters throughout the country which try to express some concept in English, but often fail, and sometimes hilariously so ...


Toyota's F1 Exhibit

Toyota's F1 Exhibit

How do we get that great B-roll video for our "Car Nut TV" show and website? Well, some of it is shot by Carey at big auto shows and their various exhibits, as she is doing in this shot taken at the Toyota F1 exhibit at the 40th Tokyo Motor Show.


Japanese Men In Some Of Their Various Uniforms

Japanese Men In Some Of Their Various Uniforms

The Toyota/Lexus execs are in the dark suits. There's more than one reason the company is known as "the GM of Japan". You can also spot a couple of photographers, who are expected (and allowed) to sport more casual and/or sporting dress. Very often artists (including automotive stylists) sport long-ish hair and often wear a beret to announce their "artiness". Keep in mind, this is a country where everything is regulated, from the organized crime of the Yakuza gangs who have office buildings and list themselves in the phone book, to the cab driver with his (never her!) white gloves and white doilies on the cab's passenger seats. A uniform and a title for everything and everyone; anything (or anyone) out of the ordinary drives them crazy!


Toyota's Hi-CT

Toyota's Hi-CT

A dance number (with dancers who resemble American gangsters of the '30s, for unknown reasons) announce the Toyota Hi-CT, a strange-looking contraption which can run on a variety of alternative fuels, including using hydrogen to power a fuel cell system which makes electricity out of the hydrogen with the only exhaust pure H2O.


Hi-CT From Toyota

Hi-CT From Toyota

Another view of dancing American-style gangsters introducing the Toyota Hi-CT varied-fuel vehicle to the motoring press from around the world.


Volkswagen Space Up!

Volkswagen Space Up!

VW will be exhibiting this vehicle at various shows around the world; its Tokyo appearance followed its introduction a few weeks before at the Frankfurt concave, like the Tokyo show, held only once every two years. Though everyone knows VW will be making and selling a vehicle very close in appearance to this one, and they are making their final decision on where to build a factory in the USA, none of the VW people at Tokyo would say much about it. In fact, when I asked for information at the exhibit's media desk, I was given a card with VW's web address! That's the way to foster good press relations (something at which VW has never been good).


Daihatsu Mud-Master C

Daihatsu Mud-Master C

Daihatsu is celebrating their 100th birthday this year, and for that special event have come up with a new slogan announced at the show: "Innovation for Tomorrow". OK, not earth-shaking, but cute. And in Japan, cute (known as "kawaii") is everything. With Toyota ownership guaranteeing them a constant and consistent huge flow of cash, this is one company which can afford to show-off many concepts at show, and they didn't fail us this year. This "Mud-Master C", says Daihatsu, "leverages compactness and light weight for high off-road agility and adopts body-on-frame construction for outstanding durability and cargo capability". Oh, ok, it's a 4x4 truck with a very short wheelbase but smart use of interior space ... If you happen to be a mountain biking fan.


Daihatsu's "Mud-Master C" Concept

Daihatsu's "Mud-Master C" Concept

The name got us to wondering: If this is "Mud-Master C", what happened to "A" and "B"? Note the "Oakley" sticker on the leading edge of the front door ... An American outfit which has done fabulous marketing in Japan, positioning themselves as "the" sunglass and other products for high-class outdoor sports (and the Japanese like to buy only the best of everything, no matter their sport or favorite outdoor activity --- And they have the money to do it).


Daihatsu Develops Self-Regenerative Catalyst Process

Daihatsu Develops Self-Regenerative Catalyst Process

Daihatsu has found a way to make the precious metals in catalytic converters "self-regenerate" themselves ... A truly amazing chemistry accomplishment! Be sure to 'click' on the photo to make it larger so you can read the story yourself, directly from Daihatsu's Tokyo Motor Show exhibit (whose name, incidentally, means "Big Company" or "Best #1 Company").


Daihatsu Tanto

Daihatsu Tanto

This is a new and supposedly conceptual version of Daihatsu's popular (in Japan and throughout Asia) Tanto small truck. There's an entire line of Tantos, many of them exhibited at the show, from the stock Tanto seen here, to the New Tanto, New Tanto Custom and New Tanto Welcome Seat (which sounds as if it might come with an on-board privvy, like a boat).


Daihatsu New Tanto Opens Up

Daihatsu New Tanto Opens Up

Lots of room and room that's easy to get to ... That was the theme of many exhibits by the Japanese car-makers at Tokyo. Realizing it's one thing to offer (and promote) a lot of interior space and quite another to make it easy to get to that room and make use of it, sliding doors, gull wing doors, suicide doors (ugh) and various other designs and contraptions were trotted-out by various companies to gauge public reaction to their efforts. Some of the ideas and concepts we saw at the show will no doubt be a part of production cars and trucks in just a few short years to come.


Daihatsu HSC

Daihatsu HSC

The company's "Human Smile Concept" (oh, you just knew they were going to sneak in one of those "cute-sy" names, didn't you?) is, says Daihatsu, "a new direction in earth-friendly, human-friendly small car design". Well, it is small and it might be fun to drive ...


Daihatsu HSC (Human Smile Concept)

Daihatsu HSC (Human Smile Concept)

Rear 3/4 shot of the HSC, which indeed has some interesting lines that can bring a smile to someone who likes cars and appreciates a cool, small and hip design. Note the 'suicide doors' in the rear; don't you think they have wondered why they're called that? It is not a nice name, and it has a meaning, if only they'd ask.


Daihatsu HSC front 3/4 view

Daihatsu HSC front 3/4 view

Daihatsu is justifiably proud of their HSC (Human Smile Concept) seen for the first time at this year's Tokyo Motor Show. Of all the Daihatsu concepts seen at the show, this one might be the closest to actual production.


Daihatsu HSC (doors open)

Daihatsu HSC (doors open)

Plenty of room in Daihatsu's HSC (Human Smile Concept --- and I could not have made up that name) with all four doors opened. The rear "suicide doors" are an exercise in styling and not reality; as soon as the Japanese figure out why they are called "suicide doors" and a few people are unfortunately hurt due to their use, those doors will be history, and quickly so. Also, the wide-opening doors don't make sense for Japan or Europe, where narrow streets and even narrower alley ways are the norm.


Daihatsu HSC Wide Open

Daihatsu HSC Wide Open

The magic of many of the cars exhibited at Tokyo was not only their amount of interior space; it's the amount of actual usable interior room and the ease of entry and exit into and out of the car or truck. Daihatsu's HSC uses many design tricks, including the super-thin seats front and rear (used, too, on the original GM "EV1" electric car). There seems to be acceptable rear legroom for, at least, small-ish passengers.


Toyota Hi-CT

Toyota Hi-CT

Someone lose their "GM Futureliner"? One of the weirdest vehciles ever shown at the Tokyo Motor Show, Toyota nearly takes the cake with their "Hi-CT". Toyota's motto for the show: "Harmonious Drive --- A New Tomorrow For People and the Planet" seems to have nothing to do with this "Far-out, man!" battle wagon. But it does utilize, among other propulsive experiments, a hydrogen fuel cell system which makes electricity out of hydrogen to power electric motors on each wheel, and the only exhaust is pure H2O. Well, maybe it does have some good aspects, because it sure ain't winning any styling contests ...


Toyota Hi-CT Profile View

Toyota Hi-CT Profile View

It is hard to explain this vehicle in words (other than comparing it to the front half of a "GM Futureliner" from the 1950s), and even photos can't really show its size, presence and impact. Take it from us ... It's as ugly as it looks in the photos, and smaller, too.


Toyota Hi-CT Rear View

Toyota Hi-CT Rear View

Here's the Toyota Hi-CT with its rear deck opened, and perhaps one can perceive the overall small-ish size of the vehicle. The hydrogen fuel cell on-board this concept stores hydrogen to use as a "fuel" which the fuel cell turns into electricity used to power motors on the vehicle's wheels, and all the other parasitic systems on the vehicle, from air conditioning to the big sound system to all the exterior and interior lights (light emitting diodes, LEDs, are used throughout as they drain little power compared to conventional lighting systems). It's a big step in the right direction as far as technology, but, oh, save us from this design!


Daihatsu "Tanto" for the Physically-Challenged

Daihatsu "Tanto" for the Physically-Challenged

The second Press Day at the 40th Tokyo Motor Show, besides being open to the international media (and a total of some 2,000 media, from Japan and elsewhere, combined), is also open to those Japanese who are physically-challenged. We don't know exactly how they get to the show, but there must be some sort of year-long promotion with schools and perhaps hospitals and rehabilitation facilities in and around Tokyo, and specially-outfitted vehicles are then employed to transport them to the show and then back home afterwards. While there, one vehicle which definitely caught their eyes and those of the media, too, was this latest version of Daihatsu's ever-popular Tanto small truck, this concept outfitted with a power gate and winch to make getting a wheelchair, with its passenger, in and out of the truck with relative ease.


"Tanto" for the Physically-Challenged from Daihatsu

"Tanto" for the Physically-Challenged from Daihatsu

A front 3/4 view of the popular Tanto small truck from Daihatsu. Their small truck, in this concept case outfitted with equipment which makes it ideal for use by wheelchair-bound, physically-challenged passengers, is an example of Japan improving access of all types for that population throughout their nation; when we first visited Japan, in 1979, it appeared to be a country where physically-challenged members of the population were treated as an 'afterthought', if they were thought about at all. With the Japanese people always striving to show the most perfect face to visitors (especially foreigners), the physically-challenged were even seen as an embarrassment, and we've had the experience, many years ago, of Japanese actually approaching us (obviously we were "gaijin", or foreigners) and apologizing for someone in our line-of-sight who needed assistance of some kind to get across the street, open a door, etc. Thankfully, those days seem to be over, or at least heading in the right direction. This concept Tanto, which allows Japan's citizens in need of a wheelchair to be a part of society, is an example of change in a very old, and very discriminatory, mind-set. Also, vehicle builders and marketers plan for such vehicles which will appeal to that largest and growing group of Japan's population, those over 65 years of age.


Subaru Impreza-based WRC Rally Race Car Concept

Subaru Impreza-based WRC Rally Race Car Concept

Subaru says this WRC is a concept "based on the new Impreza and is one concept of a future styling direction for world rally cars". With the recent death of Subaru's championship rally WRC driver Colin McRae in his native Scotland, in an accident which occurred while he was piloting a helicopter which he was licensed to fly, seeing "his" car on the center stand in the Subaru exhibit was a terribly sad and moving experience. Note that the car has no numbers or driver/navigator names on it, in tribute to McRae and all other WRC drivers and navigators in the history of the sport. Also killed in this horrible crash, which happened in typically Scottish weather --- cold and rainy --- were McRae's small son as well as his neighbor and his young son. It was, in all, a terrible disaster for the families involved, and for all of racing, too.


2008 WRX STi Subaru

2008 WRX STi Subaru

Has Subaru changed their most recognizable and important car's appearance simply "because they could"? Sometimes, it really is better to "leave well enough alone". Subaru says that "the history of the WRX STi is characterized by the unrelenting pursuit of sheer driving pleasure, and this new model is no exception". Agree or not, there's no arguing the fact that the car appears, at first glance, to have been run through the "de-excitement machine".


Subaru Impreza WRX STi Street Machine

Subaru Impreza WRX STi Street Machine

This latest version of one of the most popular cars to ever come out of Japan has indeed been "bored-out", but not in the engineering sense. As Saab did with their most recent new model, seemingly taking all the 'soul' out of the machine and making it look much more like any generic "GM-type" small car, Fuji Heavy Industries (as Subaru is known in Japan, where it is only a small part of a huge consortium wihch biulds everything from oil tankers to locomotives and just about everything in-between) seems to go "more conservative" with a car where "the wilder the better" has been the norm for several years.


Subaru's New "ADA" All-Wheel Drive System

Subaru's New "ADA" All-Wheel Drive System

Cutaway, "ghost" view of the Impreza's new "ADA" all-wheel drive system allows consumers at the 40th Tokyo Motor Show to view the working system while it is actually "in action" and compare its operation to traditional AWD systems.


Subaru WRX STi Profile

Subaru WRX STi Profile

Fuji/Subaru doesn't sell too many of their Impreza WRX STi model in any of the many countries worldwide where it is made available by Fuji Heavy Industries. They prefer to keep the performance and the pricing of the AWD car high, and the actual number of units sold low, in the classic show business spirit of "always leave them wanting more". In spite of complaints, which we say are justified, that the car has been made "too smooth" and "ultra-conservative" in appearance, if not in performance, thankfully, we expect Subaru to sell-out just as many models as they can build.


All-new WRX STi Impreza from Subaru

All-new WRX STi Impreza from Subaru

The hood scoop makes the car ... Without that one artistic (and functionally necessary) touch from the Fuji/Subaru engineers, this photo would be a lot more boring to the average viewer and car enthusiast. In this, the Fuji/Subaru high-powered WRX STi version of their bread-and-butter Impreza model, we think it's a bit too conservative considering the more-than-300 horsepower being pumped from the turbo-charged "boxer" configuration engine.


Subaru/Fuji Heavy Industries "Exiga" 7-Passenger Concept

Subaru/Fuji Heavy Industries "Exiga" 7-Passenger Concept

The two "featured" cars in the Subaru/Fuji exhibit were the Impreza WRX STi rally-racer-wannabe and this very hip station wagon, the Exiga (no, we don't know what it means). Subaru says "a vibrant candy red pearl body color (makes) for a dynamic and exhilarating presence". Can't argue with them on that ... This is a big attention-grabber. The car's "ultra-large glass roof and theater layout with staggered seat heights results in an open and comfortable interior with a panoramic view from any seat". Exiga has a 2.0 liter, horizontally-opposed (boxer) turbocharged engine and a low center of gravity, with a "well-balanced, laterally symmetrical All-Wheel Drive system". There's also a five-speed transmission (one would think a concept car in 2007 would offer more gears than a mere five-speed, when eight-speed trannies are widely available in various showrooms).


Subaru/Fuji Heavy Industries "Exiga" Concept 7-Passenger Wagon

Subaru/Fuji Heavy Industries "Exiga" Concept 7-Passenger Wagon

A front 3/4 view of the Exiga concept on display at the Subaru/Fuji Heavy Industries exhibit at the 40th Tokyo Motor Show. The color was more than attractive in quite a powerful way; in fact, if the doors to the Convention Center had been opened, I imagine there might have been a swarm of honey bees heading directly for this concept. A powerful 2.0 Liter "boxer" engine (just like Porsche!) with a turbocharger to boot, this wagon was one of more than a few shown at the Makuhari Messe Convention Center; there weren't so many wagons on display that one would think the minivan years might be over, but certainly many of the Asian car-makers are seriously exploring the possibilities of building station wagons for a world of car-buyers (mostly in Japan and North America) whom may very well be somewhat tired of minivans (like all those "empty-nesters", couples whose kids have left home for work or school or marriage, or some combination of all three, tired of the traditional minivan, but still wanting a large amount of interior space with some peppy performance and handling).


Subaru/Fuji G4e Electric Concept

Subaru/Fuji G4e Electric Concept

Subaru/Fuji Heavy Industries says that the "lightness" engineered into this G4e electric vehicle, will help it to achieve a range of 200 kilometers per charge. They also say that the vehicle's "triangular shape" is an "image of a car heading towards the future". Well, if they say so ...


G4e Concept from Fuji/Subaru

G4e Concept from Fuji/Subaru

From this angle, Fuji/Subaru's G4e electric vehicle (EV) looks more than a bit like the VW New Beetle. Subaru calls their G4e "a futuristic environment-friendly concept electric vehicle". Subaru uses "high-performance, next-generation lithium ion batteries" (the battery of choice in almost every EV or gas/electric hybrid in the show) in this G4e.


G4e Electric Vehicle Concept From Subaru/Fuji Heavy Industries

G4e Electric Vehicle Concept From Subaru/Fuji Heavy Industries

G4e can hold five adults, because the batteries and electric motors are underneath the passenger cabin. What's the secret to getting 200 kilometers from a single charge in this G4e concept? Subaru says it's theuse of high-performance, next-generation lithium ion batteries, the use of ultra-light body panels and interior pieces whenever possible, and changing the public's perception of an EV from a larger vehicle bogged down with heavy batteries to more of a light weight exercise in automotive engineering.


Tokyo's Show Girls Say Goodnight!

Tokyo's Show Girls Say Goodnight!

Every day of the two Press Days, all the girls "working" the exhibits at the show listen for a decidedly shmaltzy version of "Auld Lang Syne" played over the Convention Center's PA system and head for their appointed stations, preparing to "bow" goodnight to all attendees. It's worth hanging around until the end to enjoy this little exercise in goodwill ...


Show Girls Bid Goodnight To The Media

Show Girls Bid Goodnight To The Media

Lining-up like a somewhat shorter version of the "Radio City Rockettes", the Tokyo Motor Show's exhibit girls big "good night" in a special and memorable (and photogenic) way at the end of the two Press Days at the show.


More Show Girls!

More Show Girls!

The Tokyo Motor Show's exhibition and display girls, adorned in something you might see on dancers on old "Love Boat" episodes (Remember them? They were called "The Love Boat Mermainds" and I actually knew one of them pretty well) ... Anyway, when the clock strikes "5" each of the two Press Day closings, all these uniformed girls line up on the red carpet and literally "bow" a deep and meaningful and heart-felt (yeah, sure ... their feet hurt as much as ours by this point in the show, I'm certain) "good night" (or, "oyasu-minasai") to all the media members ... and there were about 2,000 of us.


Tokyo Motor Show Girls Escape!

Tokyo Motor Show Girls Escape!

After their "good night" bow, the show girls line up again and march off into that cool and wet Tokyo night ... To who knows where, actually ...


More Tokyo Show Girls Say "Good night!"

More Tokyo Show Girls Say "Good night!"

Any media member who has been to this show before knows to pace him/her self in order to still be conscious and not in too much foot and leg pain by the 5pm ending of the show each of the two Press Days. Otherwise, how else could they enjoy the fabulous "good night bow" from the show's uniformed "show girls"?


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